Herewith, an anonymized and truncated version of a recent conversation:

FRIEND: My computer is f*cking up again.

ME: CHROMEBOOK!

FRIEND: Yeah, after years of you saying that, I think I may just go that way.

ME: Here’s a link to one for like $65 on NewEgg that’s probably the same one I’m using as my laptop. My two work computers together, both Chromebooks (I rigged up a Chromebook the screen went out on to use as my desktop machine) came to, I think, less than $200 altogether.

FRIEND: I’m going to buy mine from Best Buy. That way it’s covered under my Geek Squad subscription. [Note: My read is that a Geek Squad subscription covers machines not bought from Best Buy]

Yes, I’ve heard of Geek Squad, seen their vehicles driving around town, had a vague idea of what they do, etc. But this made me go have a look at what they offer.

Basically, they charge, every year, about the price of a budget Windows PC (or a pretty good Chromebook) to talk you through un-f*cking your machine, or remotely unf*ck your machine, when Windows/MacOS and/or proprietary Windows/MacOS software f*cks your machine up.

I guess they would do the same thing for Chromebooks/Chromeboxes if Chromebooks/Chromeboxes had such problems, but I’ve never experienced such problems with a Chromebook/Chromebox.

Non-remote stuff, where they have to come out to your house and get on the machine, costs extra (and ain’t cheap). Hardware repairs/replacements not included so far as I can tell (and that makes sense — you’re paying for time/expertise, not physical stuff).

I don’t see how that kind of offering makes any financial sense for the average consumer who’s even remotely computer-literate.

I also don’t see how a Windows or MacOS machine makes any sense versus a Chromebook/Chromebox for the average consumer, computer-literate or not.

In fact, I’d say that Windows/MacOS = injury, and Geek Squad = added insult.

Imported from the original KN@PPSTER