Let me, like Barack Obama, be very, very clear here:

The “anti-anti-Semitism” resolution in the US House of Representatives isn’t about anti-Semitism, or about any other kind of hate or bigotry.

It’s about the Israeli lobby throwing its weight around.

The fact that the measure is actually controversial is good news.

It means that things are changing.

Until recently, an “anyone who criticizes this particular ethno-religious garrison state, or for that matter fails to support giving that ethno-religious garrison state’s government anything it might happen to demand, HATES JEWS!” resolution like this would have passed pretty much without objection.

Until recently, any American politician with the unmitigated gall and temerity to fail to render sufficiently numerous and effusive standing ovations when the prime minister of Israel deigned to address Congress, to question the billions of dollars in annual US welfare checks to Israel or Israel’s de facto veto over US foreign policy, or, heaven forfend, to even so much as mention the influence (heck, the existence) of the domestic Israeli lobby could count on (possibly after one warning, like the warning that turned Donald Trump from “neutral in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict” to “the most pro-Israel presidential candidate in history”) very quickly finding a smoking crater in the spot where his or her future political prospects once resided.

The thing might still pass, but the fact that there’s an actual fight over it means the time when that stuff can’t be talked about without fear is passing.

Good.

Imported from the original KN@PPSTER