Actually, one thing the eyes don’t have, yet, is glaucoma.

The initial “puff of air” test apparently gave an even higher than usual result than usual (it’s usually “high normal”), into the glaucoma range, so I had to go through the whole thing with anesthetic drops and a more direct pressure test, dilation of the eyes and looking at them with a microscope, etc. “High normal,” not glaucoma, no damage to the optic nerve, as always.

No diabetic retinopathy, either.

And, heck, not even any significant change in my prescription. Tiny change in one eye, but the doctor said not big enough that I really need new glasses unless I want them. I may get some soon just because I tend to be hard on frames and they get all loose and decrepit fairly quickly. I buy from — affiliate link warning! — EyeBuyDirect. So far as I can tell, the frames and lenses are as good as the ones I usually get at a regular place, and have never set me back more that $25 or so for the whole package. Then again, I always buy the cheapest clearance frames. If I was good looking, I might try to enhance that with my frame choice. Fortunately, I’m ugly enough that no frame choice would make a real difference in either direction anyway, so I save myself the money.

As to what the eyes do have:

  • Pigment Dispersion Syndrome, which is a risk factor for a second variety of glaucoma.
  • A nevus — a mole or freckle inside the eye that’s generally not a problem but that in rare cases turns out to be a melanoma.
  • Cataracts — both far from being surgery-worthy and one apparently barely detectable.
Traditional medicine’s answer to all of the above being “get checked out again in a year.” But I’ll be reviewing the non-traditional-medicine options at my disposal as well  🙂

Imported from the original KN@PPSTER